At this time of the year sure many of you already have the Christmas tree installed at home. If it is not your case but you would like to, we suggest that if you have a 3D printer you should download a tridimensonal model and, if you follow the advice of Richard Zhang, you will succeed in it and taking advantage of the filament coil to the maximum without throwing a single gram of plastic to the trash.

Some samples to feed your imagination

Some samples to feed your imagination

This professor of computer science at Simon Fraser University posed about designing a new way to print objects to avoid wasting plastic and to be more efficient. His designs have led him to develop an algorithm capable of decomposing a 3D model that allows small pyramidal parties spend less material and save time in the production of the piece.

Richard Zhang and his creations

Richard Zhang and his creations

All is reduced to a few pyramids

When a 3D printer deposits the melted plastic layer by layer from the bottom up, if the shape protudes in the form of a branch, you need to insert more material to hold it. This additional plastic then we have to remove it from the object to not ruin the original form so it can be considered a residue that is not much worth. In addition to it, removing it is not an easy task as it may compromise the structure and its resistance.

Even with a star

Even with a star

With this algorithm what is sought is to deconstruct an object in a number of pyramids that are not perfect but enough pyramidal to sustain the structure with guarantees and not print more than enough. In addition it is prepared so that you can paste multiple pieces and create an even larger object, like a Christmas tree. Of course the algorithm can be used to create all kinds of objects but, taking into account these dates, undoubtedly printing a Christmas tree is pretty curious!

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