The oldest finding of social gathering around a campfire discovered archaeologists in a cave in Israel. The hearth around which sat our distant ancestors aged 300,000 years and sets new standards for the development of human social bonds. Archaeologists identified the goal of two meters in diameter Qesem cave located about 20 km east of Tel Aviv. The findings were identified near the stadium and different ash layers indicate that the cave was used as a hunting lodge or occasional residence of people and spent time around the fire.

Qesem cave, Israel

Qesem cave, Israel

Qesem cave, Israel

Qesem cave, Israel

These findings take us to the time when man started using fire to cook as well as a social gathering. The findings also suggest that before 300,000 years the cognitive and social development of man was in remarkably high levels, says Ruth Sachak Gros, Institute of Science Weizman, lead researcher. According to the researchers, the construction of this outbreak required a high level of intelligence. The study is published in the journal, Journal of Archaeological Science, and among other raises issues about the presence of Homo sapiens from which they originate. According to the prevailing theory was introduced to Africa before 200,000 years. But the presence of people with high intelligence and sociability 100,000 earlier and even in another area creates new data, requiring responses from the scientific community.

Qesem cave, Israel

Qesem cave, Israel

Qesem cave, Israel

Qesem cave, Israel

By Nicole P.

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