What does space sound like? What would seem a rhetorical question, perhaps even poetic, and to which only a few and lucky astronauts had answer, has been resolved. Space agency NASA has declassified the sounds recorded by their missions in outer space. A file that has memorable moments of space adventure, as the historic “Houston, we have a problem” or that “3, 2, 1, off…”  that launched Apollo 11 into orbit.

But not everything’s going to be historical moments here: it also reveals the answer to questions that more than one has wondered: And the stars, how do they sound like? And the thunders on Jupiter? And the comets traveling through the nothingness?

The answer is surprisingly similar to the imagination of Hollywood makers and television: a series of beeps and strange ‘space’ sounds show up on the web, which includes the ‘voice’ of Sputnik or the strange buzz of the light curves of KIC7671081B star.

Although there is room for newness: the space is unusually loud, and as a sample the roars of radio waves in the Earth’s atmosphere, a comet passing by or thunders over Jupiter; those sounds are available a week ago in NASA SoundCloud web, the soundtrack of outer space.

So this is how it sounds, for example, Enceladus, one of Saturn’s moons:

But don’t think we’re privileged, cause this is not the first time space gets installed on worlwide screens. Some astronauts, like Chris Hadfield on land, and Reid Wiseman, in orbit, have used their space travels to publish spectacular photos and videos from outer space.

Chris Hadfield sharing his world with us

Chris Hadfield sharing his world with us

Reid Wiseman and his buddy

Reid Wiseman and his buddy

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